The Politicians have laid the blame, but now it’s time to identify and resolve the issue

So now that the politicians have had a moan about who’s at fault for the chaos on the M80 at Cumbernauld, we need to dig a little deeper into the issue.

Sure the weather is the main culprit, and there’s not much we can directly do about that. There were plenty of warnings about the possibility of problems with a Red Warning from the Met Office which was highlighted ahead of schedule by Transport Minister, Humza Yousaf. He was perhaps a little too enthusiastic in his foreboding before the Red Warning was actually issued and came across as another politician trying to grab the headlines – this probably reduced the potency of the crucial Met Office message as folk politely ignored him and carried on regardless.

But if we look back, we see that at the end of February 2017, the exact same problem arose in the exact same location hit us when “a weather bomb” from Storm Doris struck central Scotland.

Now this is the real issue – the same problem, happening in the same location, two years running – so this is what we should be encouraging our politicians to looks at. You should note that this stretch of road was upgraded to motorway as part of a Government project that was completed in 2011 at a cost of £320m.

As much as we like to criticise the Council, this is not a Council road, it is a Scottish Government road, so instead of laying blame at the foot of the hauliers, perhaps now the politicians can get some folk round a table and sort out what the issue is with the road they designed and now manage, and how the issue will be dealt with more effectively moving forward.

There’s Plenty of Competition – But What is the Health of the Grassroots Game

Piece put together for the WeegieRugby blog asking the question about the health of rugby in Scotland at a grassroots level.

Looking at West 1, 2 and 3, there’s plenty of challenge at the top and bottom of the leagues, but the number of unfulfilled games in these leagues and in the West Regional leagues, suggest that things are far from healthy. Continue reading There’s Plenty of Competition – But What is the Health of the Grassroots Game

One Win and a Slice of Luck Guarantees 8th Spot at Hamilton 7s

The Murrayfield marketing department have issued their update on the 7s globe trotting adventures under the headline of “Top 8 finish for Scotland 7s in Hamilton”, alas a little digging, and it didn’t take much, reveals that whilst they did finish 8th and pick up 10 points as a result, they only managed to win one game out of five.

Continue reading One Win and a Slice of Luck Guarantees 8th Spot at Hamilton 7s

Are We Eradicating Diesel Engines from the UK for a Predominantly London based Issue

The BBC are reporting on an EarthSense project which maps NO2 pollution hot spots in the UK

They report that on a scale of 1-6 (6 being with the highest category of pollution), no places in Britain measured a 6 and, less than 1% measured a 4 or 5. 3/4s of the hot spots with the worst ratings are in London.

Continue reading Are We Eradicating Diesel Engines from the UK for a Predominantly London based Issue

Mt Angung – not headlines news

I’m fascinated by todays coverage of Harry & Meghan. Good for them, but don’t get how it’s the main headline story when as a nation we’re trying to come to terms with things like Brexit, ongoing harassment stories, Catalonia, political turmoil in Germany, whilst things like nuclear war with North Korea could be just around the corner, or perhaps we’ll get a major volcanic eruption in Bali.

When MT Agung erupted in 1963, there were 2000 people killed. But not to worry, we look likes we’ll get a Royal wedding in the spring.

Is Selling Beer A Sustainable Way to Fund Rugby Clubs

For years now (generations), rugby clubs and their social clubs have been synonymously linked, but perhaps now would be a good time to question if there are valid, commercial and sustainable logic behind the reasons for the practice.

 

The argument goes that rugby guys like a beer after the game, so why not have the rugby club run its’ own bar so the money is kept in the rugby club rather to some local hostelry who will keep the profit for itself.

Continue reading Is Selling Beer A Sustainable Way to Fund Rugby Clubs

What Will Leclercq Want from their $6m Investment in Moodle

Founded in 2001, Moodle is a leading light in the opensource movement. By relying on partners (there’s currently 84 of them) to pay royalties for using the software, end-users get the software for free (but paying for support and services) whilst funds are generated for the central project.

But now, Martin Dougiamas, founder and CEO of Moodle Pty Ltd, has succumbed to an outside investor, with France based Education for the Many, injecting $6m dollars into the company.

Continue reading What Will Leclercq Want from their $6m Investment in Moodle